American Capital Provides Exclusive Breastfeeding Success

Recent research conducted in the U.S. showed 85% of mothers actually want to give their babies breast milk exclusively. But of the 85%, only 32% of women who succeed do so.

The study was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this research, the CDC used information from previously existing research that follows the lives of 3,000 women pregnant in 2005 and 2007. All women in the study were aged 18 years and at least 35 weeks pregnant and gave birth to a baby that weighed at least 2.3 kg.

When examined, all respondents were asked to answer the questionnaire at least 11 year study period. Questionnaires given from their known was pregnant.

Based on the results of the study, 1792 women or about 60%, which fills the entire questionnaire said they wanted to give the baby breast milk until a certain time period. The period of time varies from several weeks up to seven months or more. Of the respondents who intend to breastfeed, 85% of women plan to do it for three months or more. Unfortunately berapalama was their intention to breastfeed, only 32% were successful.

Most respondents who intend to breast-feed for a few months was finally stopped after a month of giving their babies milk. 15% of respondents no longer even feed the baby since she was in the hospital.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, ideally a new mothers breastfeed their babies until the age of six months. After that could begin to be given solid food, but still be breastfed at least until the age of one year.

The Project Director of the CDC, said Cria Perrine there are many things that cause mothers to give up the speed to give their babies breast milk. One is the dexterity of the hospital staff to inform mothers about the importance of breastfeeding.

“We know that the hospital has an important role. Indeed period of time (at the hospital) only briefly, but it’s actually a very important time,” said Perrine told Fox News.

In the study, Perrine and his team found some women are more likely to give up breastfeeding. They are more easy to stop breastfeeding is maternal obesity and smoking. Research on women in America also revealed women who were married or had a partner more successful breastfeeding than those who were single.

Help and care from the hospitals also influence whether or not the mother of success in achieving the target time to feed her baby. Mothers who breastfeed their babies immediately after birth and infant milk formula was not given by the hospital, more successful long-term breastfeeding.